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Doing 100 Push-Ups Everyday for a Month

This month, I’m doing 100 push-ups everyday. While this physical fitness challenge has been tough, there have been a lot of benefits which have come from it as well. In this post, I’m going to share with you how you can do 100 push-ups a day for a month to become more fit and get in shape.

Are you looking for a body weight physical fitness challenge? Do you think you could out every day for a whole month?

This month, I’ve been doing 100 push-ups a day.

Each day, no matter what, I’ve done a few sets of 20, 25, and 30 push-ups, to get pp to 100 push-ups.

While there have been some days where my chest has been sore or tired, I still got my push-ups in.

Now, my chest is feeling strong and I’ve also noticed that I’ve lost some body fat across the rest of my body.

In this post, I’m going to share with you how to do this body weight exercise challenge, talk about why push-ups are good for you, and give you motivation to crush this challenge!

How to Do 100 Push-Ups a Day for a Month

Doing 100 push-ups every day for a month is a big task to take on.

When starting out, doing push-ups are tough and can be a struggle, especially if you’ve never done them before.

The first few days, you will be sore, but after about a week, the soreness goes away and you will see the progress and gains.

For your 100 daily push-ups, you can do them anyway you want.

You can do incline push-ups, decline push-ups, regular push-ups, or vary the technique in any way you want. As long as you are getting down and have a good range of motion (getting your elbows to 90 degrees is the correct way to do a push-up), you will be making the most of this workout.

Right now, I’, doing 5 sets of 20, or 4 sets of 25 (depending on the day). These 4 or 5 sets take me between 10-15 minutes to do, but if you can’t do as many push-ups in a row as me, then you can break it up into more sets with less reps.

Doing 10 sets of 10 is the same amount of reps as 2 sets of 50.

In addition, doing 10 sets of 10 could be spread out through the day to reduce the energy spent in any one session.

If you still think 100 in a day is too much, you could start off slower.

During the first week, you could do 30 push-ups a day. Then, in the second week you can do 60 push-ups a day.

Finally, during the third and fourth weeks of the month, you can get to 100 push-ups a day.

By the third week, your body will start to get used to the increased number of push-ups and will be able to handle this increased volume.

Why are Push-Ups Good for You?

There are a number of reasons why push-ups are good for you.

Obviously, any exercise is better than no exercise, but there are a number of tangible benefits to doing push-ups.

One of the bigger benefits of push-ups is how it activates nearly every body part. When you do a push-up, you are using your chest, your shoulders, your core, your arms, and your back.

By activating all of these different body parts, you will increase the amount of muscle fibers recruited and can strengthen more than just 1 muscle group at a time.

Another benefit is how you will be stretching various muscles in your back and arms as you perform the push-up.

One more benefit is that your posture will improve through doing push-ups. The muscles that are responsible for your posture are the same ones activated when you do push-ups properly.

Finally, you can do push-ups where ever you are! I can get a great chest workout without leaving my apartment, an if you are someone who doesn’t have a lot of money, then you can save money and get in shape at home with push-ups.

Don’t You Need to Take Some Rest Days to Recover?

Make no mistake, doing push-ups every day is tough.

One thing about the human body is that it is incredibly resilient and is able to adapt to tough situations.

From experience, the first few days of this body weight exercise challenge is tough.

You are sore, and you aren’t loving life.

But, after about a week, if you are sleeping enough, eating a healthy diet with a lot of protein, and not pushing too hard else where, you will start feeling more confident and better about your progress.

In general though, if you really need a break, then you should take a break. If you are on the verge of injury, then taking a day off instead of pushing through would be best.

However, I don’t think general soreness is necessarily an injury.

With body weight exercises, the amount of work and stress you are putting on your body is not an intense amount, so you can do it more often.

At the same time, as I mentioned, you need to listen to your body to make sure you are doing what’s right for your current level of health and physical fitness.

At the end of the day, incorporating body weight exercises and push-ups can be very beneficial for you and support your current routine.

Would You Do 100 Push-Ups a Day?

Now that you have finished reading this post, I hope you are inspired and motivated to get out there and try this challenge.

While I don’t think I’d recommend it if you are doing heavy bench press (there your body definitely does need to recover), I would recommend this if you want a change in your exercise schedule and routine.

Getting stronger and becoming fit is all about consistency. By doing a little bit each and every day, you can reach your goals of becoming fit, healthy and strong.

Readers: what exercise challenges do you like doing? Would you do 100 push-ups every day for a month?

Thanks for reading!

Erik

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Best Interest – Know Your Blogger Series

Know Your Blogger Series

Best Interest

“An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” – Ben Franklin. Come read Jesse’s interview about the blog, Best Interest.
Each week at Personal Finance Blogs, we publish interviews from amazing bloggers from the personal finance space. This week, we are featuring the blog, Best Interest.
During these weekly features, we are hoping to provide a way for you to interact and learn more about different blogs in the personal finance space.
Below, you can read more about the story behind Best Interest, learn about the author, and learn personal finance tips from Best Interest to help you improve your financial situation.

A big thanks for Best Interest for this interview! Now, we will turn it over to the author for this interview.

Tell us about Best Interest

My name is Jesse Cramer, and I write at Best Interest – as in, “an investment in knowledge pays the best interest.” Ben Franklin’s quote inspired me to help others invest in their own financial knowledge. The Best Interest focuses on simplifying complex ideas so readers can truly build their knowledge base. Sometimes that involves long articles (4000+ words) or complex analysis (e.g. using MATLAB software)…but the explanations are always straightforward and entertaining.

What makes you and your blog unique?

I try to keep the Best Interest neatly balanced between technical complexity and easy reading. My mom is a retired English teacher, so reading and writing have always been a big part of my life. I appreciate good writing and try to practice it myself.
But I work full-time as a mechanical engineer. I think in terms of numbers and systems and cause-effect relationships. That technical background comes out in my writing. I think it’s necessary to explain the many different mathematically concepts in personal finance and investing.

What does “being good with your personal finances” mean to you? What are some habits you practice to keep your personal finances in order?

I think it’s important to practice what I preach. So these two questions have, essentially, the same answers.
Being good with personal finances means having knowledge—past, present, and future—of how money will interact with your life.
Measurement is key for the present and past portions. In the short-term, this means having a detailed budget that tracks your earning and spending.
For the future, and longer-term, good personal finance requires a few different parallel tasks. It means planning for upcoming purchases. It means running “trades” like the common rent vs. buy comparison. It means understanding how choices today will affect your retirement, your children’s education, or your ability to eventual buy that dream home.

What are your three articles people should read to get to know you and your message better on your site?

The three articles you should read to better know Best Interest are:

For someone looking to improve their financial situation, what’s your best advice?

The best short-term task to improve your personal finance is to get gather complete knowledge of where you stand. If you want to move forward, you first have to understand where you are and what direction you’re pointing.
You need to understand what you’re earning, what you’re spending, and what you’re saving. In my opinion, that means tracking every single dollar that passes through your hands. While it might seem like overkill, I saw a huge change in my personal finances after I incorporated 100% tracking into my personal finance.
Over the medium-term, I encourage people to follow the “personal finance order of operations.” Different versions exist depending on your source. But most start with the same basic tasks: build an emergency fund, maximize any “free” money from your employer’s retirement plan, and pay off any high-interest debt.
And then long-term, I like to put together a tentative 5-, 10-, and 20+ year plan. Nothing too serious—a lot of changes can happen in a few short years. But it helps to know things like:
  • Will you need a new car at some point?
  • Do you plan on buying a house?
  • Will you have (more) children?
  • Will you move? How could you cost of living change?
  • Are you going to retire? How much do you need to save?

What are your favorite personal finance books?

Whenever someone asks me, “What’s the first personal finance book I should read?,” I point them to I Will Teach You To Be Rich, by Ramit Sethi.
This funny book could easily be titled, “My First Book of Real Personal Finance.” It doesn’t get into the gritty details, but it does a terrific job explaining some simple concepts that every adult ought to know.
  • Why credit cards can be your worst enemy
  • How to properly set up various bank accounts
  • What’s a 401(k)? What’s a Roth IRA? And should you use them?
…And a few more concepts. If you already know answers to the questions above, then this book probably won’t add too much new knowledge. But if you don’t know the different between a Savings account and a Checking account, this would be a great way to learn some personal finance basics.
A Random Walk Down Walk Street, by Burton Malkiel is my pick for the best book on investing ever written. The book was first printed in 1973, two years before John Bogle started Vanguard. Yet, what did Random Walk presciently tout? Practices like passive investing, index funds, and the best methods for laymen to make money in the market. The very same practices that Bogle would use to revolutionize the financial services industry.
That’s why Random Walk is a cut above. It’s a book that aimed to teach the most good to the most people. And over it’s 47-year life and multiple re-printings, Random Walk keeps on proving Burton Malkiel and John Bogle right.

What is your favorite investment class and why? (stocks, private business, bonds, real estate, crypto, precious metals, etc.)

I’m a big fan of stocks—specifically, stock index funds. In my opinion, index funds provide the single best “success-to-stress” ratio of any investment out there. They keep fees to a minimum while attaining average returns. They are designed for the layperson to use and prosper from.
But beyond true investment classes, I’m a huge proponent of these (unfortunately overused) clichés: invest in yourself and learning is a lifelong process.
I use my 401(k) and Roth IRA to invest in stock index funds. But I make sure to use other money to invest in learning, to try to grow my side projects (e.g. my blog), or to take courses and classes. The return on investment (ROI) for investing in yourself can be monumental.
I feel that our society preaches “invest in yourself” throughout childhood—“try new things” and “make sure you do well at school!”. But that encouragement slows down in adulthood. It takes focused effort to continue learning, but it’s so worthwhile.

Do you have any financial mistakes you’d like to share, and how have you grown from these mistakes to improve your personal finances?

I love telling this story from my article about the “Buy that!” brain.
In short, I learned that I can be a sucker for a salesman. A little part of my brain was wild for the idea that a hot tub was the ultimate value-added item for my new house in snowy Rochester, NY. I mean, what else are you going to do on all those cold winter nights? I let my enthusiasm drag me in front of a hot tub salesman—you know, just to see what the options are. And, naturally, I walked away having bought a hot tub.
I learned some pretty important lessons about how my brain works. And I’ve taken some important steps in mitigating those monkey-brain mental shortcomings.
I know what kind of items make my brain scream “BUY THAT!!!” Usually it has to do with hiking/camping or an interesting non-fiction book. Other times, it’s as simple as a crunchy & salty snack when by stomach is rumbling. The important point is that I recognize my triggers. And because of that, I can fight them before they overwhelm my rational decision-making.

What’s a non-money related interest you have and what do you love about it?

I really love the sport of squash. I only picked it up after going to college, and it’s now my favorite form of fitness and recreation.
Squash is a racket sport played indoors. It’s a bit like racketball. But squash also has elements of chess. Sound crazy?
Chess can be played a couple different ways. Some chess players look for safe strategies that provide small advantages. They play it safe and wait for their opponent to make a bad move. It’s a grindy style. Other chess players are more dynamic. They play risky moves, attacking styles, and hope that their opponent will leave themselves open to a checkmate.
Squash is the same way. Some players hit low-risk shots, play long rallies, and do their best to keep the rallies steady and calm. But other players hit shots from wild angles or try to hit “kills” or “nicks” that win the rallies outright.
The best players, in my opinion, understand that there’s a time and place for both.
And while there’s a mental battle going on—what’s my opponent doing, and how do I counter it?—there’s also an extreme physical battle. Squash is one of the most aerobic sports and best workouts out there. It involves sprinting and lunging and, of course, hitting the ball.

Why do you believe learning about money and caring about personal finance is important?

Great question. And my answer is kind of funny. When I pare down my motivations, I don’t care about money. I care about time. Time is truly the most limited resource.
Money, it just so happens, is the preferred method to place a value on time. In the long run, I want to try to maximize my time. In fact, I’ve got some interesting theories about the value of time, or the time vs. money debate. Since we measure the value of time using money, it means that we should place priority on being smart with our money.
Need more to ponder? After taxes, the median American earns about $160 per day. So if my budgeting method saves me $1000 per year, I could think of that as saving about 6 days of working time. Or, I could say that a person not using a budget might we wasting $1000, or wasting 6 days, per year.
That time will never come back. It’s gone. And I want to minimize that wasted time.

How You Can Contact Best Interest for More Information

You can learn more about Best Interest at https://www.bestinterest.blog and follow them on Twitter at @BestInterest_JC.

Thank you for reading this interview, and thank you, Best Interest, for providing us with some great personal finance tips!

About the Know Your Blogger Series

Each week, Personal Finance Blogs features a personal finance blogger for you to learn more about who is behind the different blogs in the personal finance space.

These interviews also provide different viewpoints and tips for improving your financial situation. Check out a couple other recent interviews below, or see them all of the past blogger features here.

It’s Not Your 9 to 5
Come read about the great personal finance blog, Have Your Dollars Make Sense.
Have Your Dollars Make Sense
Come read about the great personal finance blog, Have Your Dollars Make Sense.
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March 27th Features

 

 

 

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Deliberate Practice: How to Improve at Anything in Life

Deliberate practice, or intentional practice, is the key to learning and improving at any skill, hobby or interest. Instead of going through the motions, having a plan with deliberate actions for improvement will be very beneficial.

Everyone has heard the old adage “Practice makes perfect”, but that’s not actually an accurate statement.

Actually, practice makes permanent.

If you practice spelling the word “business”, but actually memorize it incorrectly as “buziness”, it’s going to be much harder to correct that mistake in the future, because you’ve already built up the memory of the misspelled word. 

The way you practice is just as important as setting aside the time to practice itself. And there’s a dynamic approach to practice that will help avoid practicing incorrectly. It’s called deliberate practice.deliberate practice 

What is Deliberate Practice?

Deliberate practice isn’t just using repetition to craft a skill. Repetition, while important, can only get you so far.

Instead, deliberate practice is the practice of breaking down each aspect of what you’re trying to master and identifying the patterns and techniques that will propel you towards mastery and help you achieve confidence in the area you want to master. 

The practice is systematic and purposeful. The goal is to increase intense focus and perfect the activity you’re practicing. You start with big picture ideas and break them down into bite sized chunks. Then you practice perfecting those smaller tasks, and eventually, you’ve mastered an entire skill set. 

5 Steps to Use Deliberate Practice to Improve in Life

Using deliberate practice will help you unlock your full potential and start getting the life that you want. It takes your skills and brings them to the next level by consistent, systematic practice. 

Below, I have laid out 5 steps you can take to use deliberate practice in you life to reach your goals:

  1. Identify Your Goals and Dreams
  2. Create a Game Plan for Deliberate Practice
  3. Be Intentional in Your Practice and Take Action
  4. Be Consistent with Your Actions
  5. Reassess and Tweak Your Plans Over Time

Let’s dive into each of these in more detail now.

1. Identify Your Goals and Dreams

You want to look at your future and ask yourself realistically, where do you see yourself and who do you want to be as a person?

Answering those two questions will give you a good idea of where to start.

You want to focus on things that you can develop, like career skills or maybe you want to learn a new language, or hit a home run during the company wide softball game. They should be skills you can develop or goals you want to achieve – rather than objectives, like making partner at your firm in two years.

Objectives are good to have as well, but we really want to hone in on the skills that might get you there. Like learning C++ or mastering Excel.

You want to make sure that you’re being clear about what you want. 

You might even want to consider using the SMART goals guidelines when dreaming about who you want to be. SMART goals help you create specific, measurable, attainable, time-bound goals. I have a great tutorial about how to get started here

If you’re more specific and calculated about what your goals and dreams are, then you’ll have a clearer picture to use to create a game plan. 

2. Create a Game Plan for Deliberate Practice

You know your goals, now it’s time to come up with a game plan.

You have your dream. What do you have to do to MAKE it happen?

That’s where deliberate practice comes in. Deliberate practice is the science of devising a plan to help you get from where you are today to where you want to be. It allows you to stop self doubting because you’ve built a firm foundation. 

Making your dream happen requires you creating a game plan for action. The 5 steps for creating a game plan for your life is as follows:

Let’s dive into each of these steps to create a practice plan for yourself below.

Research

Researching is the most important step of making an action plan for your success.

You want to look at where you are, and figure out the best step going forward.  The more informed your research is, the better your deliberate practice will be, because you’ve taken the time to make sure you’re understanding what you’re trying to perfect. 

Say your goal is to learn yoga, you want to figure out what kind of yoga you’re interested in: karma, bhakti, jnana, or raja. 

You also want to figure out the most basic poses for that specific type of yoga, and best practices in order to practice them. 

Next, you’d want to build a more complicated sequence, and continue exploring methods and poses. 

This gives you your guideposts and metrics to know what is correct posture, and what is not. 

patience at work

Identify Experts to Emulate

You also want to find experts to emulate. This could mean several things. Either attending a yoga class taught at your local community center, or following a yogi on YouTube and watching their videos. 

Finding a class is the more preferred method. It gives you direct feedback on your form and posture. Along with some structure and method techniques that you might not get self teaching. 

However, if a class is not accessible to you, finding videos on YouTube could prove a useful substitute. You can watch proper form. 

Start Slow and Practice Often

This is the most important part of preparation. You want to make sure that you’ve set aside time every day (or several dedicated times a week) to practice your craft. 
But almost more importantly, you want to make sure that you’re progressing slowly. Dedicated practice is systematic. And these systems only work if you’ve designed them to give yourself enough time to master the basics before moving onto intermediate work. 

This is how Joe DiMaggio got so good at baseball. He started with the basics. He practiced them often and he built on existing skills. But he couldn’t do that without making sure he was dedicating enough time to the craft. 

So make sure that you’re taking the time you actually need to practice. Instead of trying to get good insanely fast, as this often leads to bad technique and burnout. 

Spend Time Self Critiquing and Evaluating Technique

Another crucial aspect of planning is to make sure you’re allowing space and time in your process to self critique and evaluate your own technique. As mentioned above, the best way to do this is to have an instructor advise you, but there are other ways to prepare for this. 

If you’re practicing child’s pose, record yourself following along to a yoga session from YouTube. Then watch both videos simultaneously. Make sure to note where your form doesn’t mimic the instructors, and then critique your learning plan to spend time perfecting that specific pose. 

Celebrate the Small Wins Along the Way

And make sure you’re planning to celebrate the small wins along the way. Part of deliberate practice is learning to self motivate. 

Choosing specific milestones in your practice plan to celebrate will help keep you going and pushing towards that goal. 

Maybe that’s holding a pose for 45 seconds for the first time, or mastering a specific salutation. What the milestones are don’t matter as much as taking the time to map them out. 

This final step really helps solidify your action plan and gets you psyched for deliberate practice. 

3. Be Intentional in Your Practice and Take Action

Now that you’ve spent a considerable amount of time planning your goals and routine and the milestones you celebrate. 

What does being intentional mean? 

First, it means showing up.  You’ve spent all this time crafting the perfect set of steps to get you from point A to point B, but they’re absolutely useless if you don’t spend the time practicing. 

Second, it means showing up wholeheartedly. You’re here, you’ve put in the time and you’re ready to go, but you still need to make sure that you’re leaving everything at the door. 

Take a moment to write down what thoughts are popping into your head about whatever distraction might make you pause and wonder if practicing is important. Then, put your phone away, turn off your notifications, do whatever you have to do to pause distractions. 

Finally, take action. Review your deliberate practice plan. Set up whatever things you need to help you succeed. I find that it’s helpful to set a timer, so that I don’t have to continue to watch the clock to know how long I’ve been practicing. And just practice. 

Use the guidelines you’ve given yourself from your deliberate practice plan to guide the session, but ultimately, putting in the time and working on the craft is going to be what makes you better. As long as you’re continually critiquing yourself and striving for more perfect repetitions.

4. Be Consistent With Your Actions

Consistency is key throughout this process.  Spending a consistent amount of time every week is going to help you master your skill. 

This is due to several factors. 

First, muscle memory is built by repetition. 

You want to make sure that you’re spending enough time on each action to get it ingrained into the body. But make sure that you’re integrating more experience techniques and making sure you’re practicing the technique correctly and critiquing yourself when you need to be. 

And second, habits are built over time. 

If you only work at something sporadically, you might get better. But you won’t be building a habit. And so much of mastery comes from habit making. 

If you want to get better at yoga, setting the habit of practicing yoga is half the battle. The habit is how you maintain consistency. 

That’s why deliberate practice focuses so much on the planning phase. We want to set you up for habitual success by taking as much decision making out of the process as possible. 

5. Reassess and Tweak Your Game Plan Over Time

This step cannot be stressed enough. It’s the key to deliberate practice and what sets deliberate practice apart from repetitive practice. It takes time and patience. It definitely won’t happen overnight. 

Reassessing your practice plan allows you to look back on progress and look forward to skills you’re hoping to acquire. It also makes sure that you’re giving yourself enough time to make sure you’re practicing to perfection. 

And if, for some reason, you’re not perfecting something, it allows you to step back and make sure all your steps are aligned with your goals. 

Practice makes permanent, and this allows practice to morph into something perfect, not just permanent. 

Stop Going Through the Motions and Employ Deliberate Practice

Deliberate practice is a great way to learn mastery of something.

Instead of going through the motions, use deliberate actions for improvement and put your deliberate practice plan in place.

I hope that this article has given you some great tips and food for thought on how you can use deliberate practice to reach your goals and dreams, and I’ll look forward to hearing how you are doing in your life as you make a game plan and put it into action!

Readers: what’s your goal? Are you going to use deliberate practice to reach your goal? What’s your plan?

Thanks for reading!

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A Purple Life – Know Your Blogger Series

Know Your Blogger Series

A Purple Life

Come read about how you can live a different, better life – A Purple Life.
Each week at Personal Finance Blogs, we publish interviews from amazing bloggers from the personal finance space. This week, we are featuring the blog, A Purple Life.
During these weekly features, we are hoping to provide a way for you to interact and learn more about different blogs in the personal finance space.
Below, you can read more about the story behind A Purple Life, learn about the author, and learn personal finance tips to help you improve your financial situation.
A big thanks for A Purple Life for this interview! Now, we will turn it over to the author for this interview.

Tell us about A Purple Life

I started writing my blog in January of 2015 to catalog my journey to early retirement. At the time I calculated that it would take me 10 years, but by decreasing my spending through domestic geo-arbitrage and increasing my salary through job hopping I cut that time in half and will be leaving the workforce in September 2020 at 30 years old.
I started the blog to keep myself motivated and accountable and it was actually a private blog until I took it public in July 2018 at the suggestion of a blogger I met for coffee. I mentioned that I had been writing on a private blog about my journey for 3.5 years and she helped me see I had nothing to lose by putting my words out there in case they could help the community so I did!
I came up with the name “A Purple Life” a little randomly. That same night after meeting that blogger for coffee I bought my domain name on a whim. I’ve always been obsessed with the color purple, love having purple hair and have even gone as far as having purple contacts at points in my life. To me, “A Purple Life” means a slightly different life, a life that involves constant questioning instead of going with what you’re given (such as brown hair in my case). It’s doing what makes you happy even if that makes you stand out or seem weird to people. It’s following what’s in your heart no matter what.

What makes you and your blog unique?

The personal finance space has a stereotype based on the larger, OG FIRE bloggers that it’s dominated by white male programmers. While the above would pretty accurately describe what PF meetups looked like when I attended them 5 years ago, it’s definitely not accurate now. I thought I could provide another, different example to help crush that stereotype further.
I’m a black woman who works in marketing and I’m here to help show that this space is more inclusive than people might think and that the path to financial independence is open to everyone. Even if your situation doesn’t allow you to save enough to retire early there are almost always steps you can take to improve your financial health.
I try to carry my slightly different perspective into my blog and highlight other ways I stray from the beaten path in case others can relate, such as the fact that I am never getting married (despite having a partner) and do not want children.

What does “being good with your personal finances” mean to you?

To me being good with your personal finances just means that you’re willing to learn. I don’t see being “good” with finance as an end destination, but a never ending pursuit. The financial landscape is constantly changing in response to new companies, products and the changing world around us.
A willingness to learn and be honest when you don’t know something is invaluable. I don’t even claim to be an expert on finance or even know what I’m doing half the time, but I’m happy to learn, change direction if I discover I’m wrong and keep going.

What are some habits you practice to keep your personal finances in order?

For me, looking at my personal finances and analyzing them regularly is key. I personally find data fascinating and it helps me to be hands on with my money. I enter everything I spend and make into YNAB by hand (instead of it syncing automatically) because it helps me to understand and internalize the money I have spent and on what. And for groceries, for example, I write out everything I bought with its price so I can go back and compare prices across different stores later if I want to.
Being this close to my finances also helps me realize where I should further optimize. For example, my HSA fees were too high so I recently moved to my HSA to a better provider with less fees. I’m going to do the same with my 401K as soon as I quit in September.
I also look at my investments daily to practice exposure therapy to the hills and valleys of the stock market. This has been very helpful because when I started saving seriously five years ago I started by seeing small dips since I had less invested and now I see my net worth go up and down more in a day than I spend in a year and as a result of this strategy I don’t bat an eye at it.

What are your three articles people should read to get to know you and your message better on your site?

What Does “A Purple Life” Mean?: This post details exactly why I call my blog “A Purple Life” and my obsession with the color purple that’s persisted through my life.
How Pursuing FIRE Has Changed How I Act At Work: This post documents how inching towards financial independence has changed my behavior at my jobs. It’s not just about the destination. Based on my experience, just pursuing this goal can drastically change how you perceive and act at work. A follow up piece to this explaining how my actions have changed further is going up on my blog in March.
Why I’m Never Getting Married: My blog is not a finance blog, but a lifestyle blog so I talk about whatever I’m thinking about that week. This post is about why my partner and I are not opting into the tradition of marriage despite the societal pressure to do so.

For someone looking to improve their financial situation, what’s your best advice?

In the short term my advice would be to figure out where your money is going by analyzing your spending, fees etc. Then make sure that where your money is going aligns with your values. If there is fat to trim that doesn’t add to your life, trim it and reallocate those funds to places that will make you happier.
In the medium term I would suggest making a plan: Where do you want to be in 5 or 10 years and what do you need to do to get there? Make a plan and start down the path so you don’t look up when you’re 40 and wonder where your life went.
For the long term my advice is: Invest! Start saving and investing now to make sure you will be set in the future with an emergency fund, savings and investments in case something unfortunate happens. Make sure you will have enough to live on if you can no longer work when you’re older.

What are your favorite personal blogs and bloggers you have been inspired by?

My favorite personal finance blogs right now are:
1. Millennial Revolution: I find their blog absolutely hilarious and also very informative and creative in how they explain investing concepts. They also provide details trip reports of everywhere they live, which is very helpful for my future nomadic plans, while being very transparent about all their numbers and separating out any income they make in retirement from what they originally saved so readers can see if their original plan (with no extra income) would have worked
2. Bitches Get Riches: These ladies are absolute geniuses who also happen to be side splittingly hilarious. They provide wonderfully in-depth articles about everything from salary negotiation to the gender pay gap. Learn about the unfairness of the world and how we can combat while laughing your face off.
3. Rich and Regular: This blog is an inspiring look at the journey of a young couple on the path to financial independence. They take up along on all their adventures from owning a rental property to writing a cookbook. As of recently they have also both quit their jobs to work on their own projects full time and continue to inspire in that way.

What are your favorite personal finance books?

My favorite finance books are:
1. Your Money Or Your Life: This was one of the first books I read when I started down this path to financial independence five years ago and its message hit me right in the gut. The main concept of the book is that when you spend money you’re not just spending pieces of paper, but the amount of your life that you spent to get that piece of paper. That idea changed everything for me and helped me really examine what mattered to me because it’s my life that I’m trading for it.
2.The Millionaire Next Door: This was another one of the first books I read and it taught me that my idea of what millionaires look like is completely off. Oftentimes the people that flaunt wealth actually don’t have much of it. It’s the quietly saving, frugal working people in middle class neighborhoods who are actually the millionaires. There is actually a more recent version of this book with updated data that I also enjoyed called The Next Millionaire Next Door.

What is your favorite investment class and why? (stocks, private business, bonds, real estate, crypto, precious metals, etc.)

Stocks – specifically broad-based stock index funds – are my personal favorite investment class. I’m (hopefully) looking at a 70 year retirement and as a result longevity is a concern for me.
Bonds, while wonderful at smoothing the roller coaster that is the market, are also a drag on a portfolio, especially over longer retirement time frames. That’s why I own 100% stocks in my portfolio. I don’t kid myself into thinking that I have some type of expertise others don’t that I could apply to buying specific asset classes or even specific stocks.

If you received a $5,000,000 windfall tomorrow, what would you do with the money?

If I received $5 million dollars tomorrow I would pay the approximately $2,500,000 of taxes that would be due on it and then quit my job and retire 6 months earlier than planned and then figure out how to best distribute that money to improve the world.
Instead of trying to sell most of what I own and prepare for a nomad life while also working full time and maintaining my blog I would just do all that stuff without the stress of work on top of it and then start my world travels in the fall as planned. I’m taking off to visit Australia, New Zealand, Argentina and Thailand so a total of 4 months. It’s interesting to realize that even that large type of a windfall actually wouldn’t change my life very much.

What’s a non-money related interest you have and what do you love about it?

I love to play the video game the Sims. I’ve been a fan since it first came out two decades ago and am a huge fan to this day. I actually live stream my games with a fellow blogger when the urge hits us over on Twitch. We’ve created a game with just people from the personal finance community (with their permission), which is silly and fun. I also live tweet some of my game play over on Twitter.
I love the storytelling aspect of the game. While some players love building houses or creating people I could honestly care less (and appreciate that other players upload their beautiful designs for us to use!) I want to see what these personalities can get up to and what kind of stories I can create. It’s the ultimate sandbox game to me and takes customization a few steps further than other sandbox games I’ve played with their complex human-style interactions. It’s a fascinating game that is different every time I play it.

How You Can Contact A Purple Life for More Information

You can learn more about A Purple Life at https://apurplelife.com/, like them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/apurplelife, and follow them on Twitter at @APurpleLifeBlog.

Thank you for reading this interview, and thank you, A Purple Life, for providing us with some great personal finance tips!

About the Know Your Blogger Series

Each week, Personal Finance Blogs features a personal finance blogger for you to learn more about who is behind the different blogs in the personal finance space.

These interviews also provide different viewpoints and tips for improving your financial situation. Check out a couple other recent interviews below, or see them all of the past blogger features here.

It’s Not Your 9 to 5
Come read about the great personal finance blog, Have Your Dollars Make Sense.
Have Your Dollars Make Sense
Come read about the great personal finance blog, Have Your Dollars Make Sense.