How Much House Can I Afford if I Make $90,000?

When it comes to the exciting journey of buying a new home, one of the most important questions to ask is, ‘How much house can I afford?

Your annual income plays a significant role in determining the answer to this question. If you’re making $90,000 a year, it’s crucial to understand the factors that influence your homebuying power and the steps you can take to make a well-informed decision.

In this article, we will take a look at the factors of how much house you can afford if you make $90,000.

How Much House Can I Afford if I Make $90,000?

A general rule of thumb is that your monthly mortgage payment should not exceed 28% of your gross monthly income. In addition, many lenders will not let borrowers have debt payments totaling more than 36% of their income.

Considering this, you can estimate your affordable home price by calculating the maximum monthly payment you can comfortably make.

Let’s now calculate how much house you can afford if you make $90,000.

First, let’s calculate the maximum mortgage payment that you can afford using the 28% DTI rule.

If you make $90,000, then your gross monthly income is roughly $7,500. Based on the 28% rule, the maximum mortgage payment you can afford is $2,100.

But, what does this actually buy you in terms of how much house you can buy? We next need to consider different interest rates to figure out how much house you can afford.

If you go with a 30 year mortgage, then we can calculate the price of the house you can buy. For the following calculations, we will assume a 20% down payment.

  • With a 4% interest rate, the biggest loan you could get based on the 28% rule is $439,869, and the most house you could afford is $549,836. To buy this house with a 20% down payment, you would need a down payment of $109,967.
  • With a 5% interest rate, the biggest loan you could get based on the 28% rule is $391,191, and the most house you could afford is $488,989. To buy this house with a 20% down payment, you would need a down payment of $97,798.
  • With a 6% interest rate, the biggest loan you could get based on the 28% rule is $350,262, and the most house you could afford is $437,828. To buy this house with a 20% down payment, you would need a down payment of $87,566.
  • With a 7% interest rate, the biggest loan you could get based on the 28% rule is $315,646, and the most house you could afford is $394,557. To buy this house with a 20% down payment, you would need a down payment of $78,911.
  • With a 8% interest rate, the biggest loan you could get based on the 28% rule is $286,195, and the most house you could afford is $357,744. To buy this house with a 20% down payment, you would need a down payment of $71,549.

With these calculations, you now know how much house you can afford if you make $90,000.

The rest of this article will be a discussion of home affordability and other factors you need to consider before buying a house.

Understanding the Debt-to-Income Ratio (DTI) for Home Buying Affordability

It’s essential to understand the concept of the debt-to-income ratio (DTI). This ratio measures the percentage of your income that goes toward paying debts each month. Lenders use DTI to assess your ability to manage additional mortgage payments.

To calculate your DTI, add up all of the debt payments you make on a monthly basis and divde this number by your monthly income.

Factors Influencing Home Affordability

Purchasing a home involves many financial considerations. Several factors directly influence the affordability of your dream home and the overall financial commitment you’ll be making. Understanding these factors is essential for making a well-informed decision.

Down Payment

The down payment is a pivotal factor in determining how much house you can realistically afford. It’s the initial lump sum you pay upfront when purchasing a home. The principle here is simple: the larger your down payment, the more manageable your monthly mortgage payments will be.

A substantial down payment not only reduces the principal amount you need to finance but also signals to lenders that you’re financially stable and committed to the investment. It can also potentially lead to better loan terms and interest rates, ultimately shaping the long-term affordability of your home.

Interest Rates

Interest rates are a pivotal element in the world of mortgages. They have a profound influence on the total cost of your loan and, consequently, your monthly mortgage payments. A lower interest rate translates to reduced borrowing costs over time, which can significantly alleviate the financial strain of homeownership.

To better understand the impact of interest rates on mortgage savings, let’s consider a concrete example involving a 30-year mortgage. Imagine you’re purchasing a home for $300,000 and are deciding between two different interest rates: 4% and 5%.

Scenario 1: 4% Interest Rate

In this scenario, you secure a mortgage with a 4% interest rate. Over the course of the 30-year term, your monthly mortgage payment would amount to approximately $1,432.25.

Total Payments over 30 Years: $1,432.25 (monthly payment) x 12 (months per year) x 30 (years) = $515,610

Scenario 1: 5% Interest Rate

Now, let’s consider a slightly higher interest rate of 5%. With this rate, your monthly mortgage payment would be around $1,610.46.

Total Payments over 30 Years: $1,610.46 (monthly payment) x 12 (months per year) x 30 (years) = $579,767

Savings from Lower Interest Rate

The difference in the total payments between these two scenarios reflects the impact of the interest rate.

Total Interest Paid in Scenario 1 (4% interest rate): $515,610 (total payments) – $300,000 (initial loan amount) = $215,610

Total Interest Paid in Scenario 2 (5% interest rate): $579,767 (total payments) – $300,000 (initial loan amount) = $279,767

By choosing the 4% interest rate instead of the 5% rate, you would save approximately $64,157 over the life of the 30-year mortgage. This is a substantial amount that showcases the significance of even a minor reduction in interest rates.

This example illustrates that seemingly small fluctuations in interest rates can lead to significant differences in the overall cost of a mortgage. A lower interest rate not only results in more affordable monthly payments but also translates to substantial long-term savings. The extra funds saved from a lower interest rate could be directed toward other financial goals, investments, or even reducing the mortgage term.

Therefore, when considering a mortgage, it’s vital to pay close attention to the interest rate, as it has a profound impact on the financial commitment you’re making over the years. It emphasizes the importance of shopping around for the best possible rate and understanding the potential financial benefits of securing a lower interest rate for your home loan.

Additional Costs to Consider

While the mortgage payment might be the most prominent financial consideration, it’s crucial not to overlook the array of additional costs associated with homeownership. These costs can significantly impact your budget and must be factored in when assessing the affordability of a home.

  • Property Taxes: Property taxes vary based on your home’s assessed value and local tax rates. They can fluctuate over time and need to be accounted for in your budget planning.
  • Homeowner’s Insurance: Protecting your investment is paramount. Homeowner’s insurance covers damages to your property and provides liability coverage. Premiums can vary based on location, property value, and coverage level.
  • Maintenance and Repairs: Homes require regular upkeep and occasional repairs. Budgeting for ongoing maintenance is crucial to ensure your home retains its value and remains a comfortable living space.
  • Homeowner’s Association (HOA) Fees: If you live in a community with shared amenities and services, HOA fees are part of the equation. These fees contribute to maintaining the community’s overall quality and can impact your monthly expenses.

Incorporating these additional costs into your financial calculations provides a holistic view of the financial commitment associated with homeownership. By doing so, you can make an informed decision that aligns with your budget and long-term financial goals.

For example, property taxes could range from a few hundred dollars a month to several hundred dollars a month. Homeowner’s insurance is likely another $100 or $200, and maintenance and repairs will depend on the house you are buying.

Balancing What You Can Afford and What You Want When Buying a Home

When it comes to buying a home, there’s a big difference between having enough money to buy it and really wanting to buy it. These two things shape how we decide about homes and money. It’s important to understand this difference so you can make smart choices that fit your home needs and your goals.

Having Enough Money to Buy a Home

This means having the money you need to buy a home without causing problems for your money situation. It’s like making sure you have enough money in your wallet to buy a toy without having to ask for more money from your parents.

For example, if you’ve saved up a good amount of money and have a good record of how you use money, you’re ready to buy a home. This shows that you have the right amount of money to buy a home without causing trouble for your other needs or things you want to do. Having enough money to buy a home is about having a solid plan for your money and knowing what you can manage.

Really Wanting to Buy a Home

On the other hand, really wanting to buy a home means you really, really want it, even if it means changing some things about your money plans.

For example, you might really want a big, fancy house in a nice neighborhood. But if getting that house means you won’t have enough money for other important things, like saving for your future, you need to think carefully about your choice.

Finding the Right Balance

The key is to find a balance between having enough money to buy a home and wanting the kind of home you dream about. This means thinking about both your money situation and what you want in a home.

While it’s okay to dream about certain things, like a big backyard or a special kitchen, you have to make sure your dream fits your money situation. This might mean making plans, like making a budget and thinking about what’s most important for your future.

Important Things to Think About

When you’re making choices about buying a home, there are a few important things to remember:

  • Fitting Your Budget: Make sure the home you want fits your budget – the money you have for all the things you need and want.
  • Long-Term Effects: Think about how your choice will affect your money situation in the long run. Will you still have enough money for important things in the future?
  • Waiting and Planning: Sometimes it’s a good idea to wait and plan before making a big choice. This can help you make a smart decision that won’t cause money problems later.
  • Other Options: Explore different ways to get what you want. Maybe there’s a different kind of home that also makes you happy and fits your budget.

When you’re thinking about buying a home, remember that having enough money to afford it and really wanting it are both important. It’s like finding the right balance between what you can manage and what you really desire. By keeping both things in mind, you can make choices that are smart for your money and your dreams of a comfortable home.

Hopefully this article has been useful for you to learn how much house you can afford if you make $90,000 a year.